138 Words on Being From Texas

I was born, raised and lived in Texas for 31 years. Strange thing is, I never identified myself as a ‘Texan’ until I came to NYC. So few people you meet here are from here. For the first time in 31 years, I had to address the fact that I am from Texas and all of the negative stereotypes and to a lesser extent, the positive ones. Now that I am forced to think about how I may be perceived as a Texan, I have developed this strange pride in being from Texas. I like the fact that I’m apparently a horse-owning, BBQ-eating, Bush-loving, trailer park-living, redneck-having, Willie Nelson-listening, pickup truck-driving, hillbilly from Texas who within 2 years, has been able to milk a little success out of this big city. (Because apparently, I owned cows as well.)

New York vs. Dallas

I love Dallas. And I love New York. This is one of the reasons I ❤ NY. These types of guys just don’t exist in Dallas.  I am not even slamming these dudes. I can totally appreciate all of our differences.   Texas has the redneck, frat boy version, but these dudes cannot be topped (no homo):

I really like that song.   Here is another…

and

and finally

Texas Rednecks: Rachofsky to Sell Koons Balloons

As intellectual as NYC inhabitants are supposed to be, I am still blown away by how clueless so many are about Texas, its culture, its cities, and perhaps most of all, the general perception of Texans’ level of sophistication. I am clearly on the low end of sophistication, but I do feel the need to document the redneck lifestyle for all the cosmopolitan New Yorkers that read my blog. Yes, I do admit that Texas has it’s morons – of all levels – just like the abundance in New York, L.A., Chicago, or anywhere for that matter.

So I am going to start a new feature on my blog called Texas Rednecks, which will hopefully serve to dispel some of the common beliefs of my more pseudo-intellectual friends in New York:

First up:

Rachofsky’s to sell Koons sculpture…

Last week, Christie’s set the record for the most money ever paid at auction for a work by a living artist with $33.64 million for a Lucian Freud painting. While the Rachofskys’ Koons piece probably won’t break that record, it should be in the neighborhood. The auction house is not publishing a pre-sale estimate, but Amy Cappellazzo, deputy chairman of Christie’s postwar and contemporary art sales, puts a conservative estimate at 12 million pounds, about $24 million.

Oh yeah, the Rachofsky’s live in Dallas. Do you think it will fit in the back of their pick-up truck? Will it fit in the back of their covered wagon? Maybe Willie Nelson can lend a hand!

Koons on the MOMA rooftop of the Met in NYC:

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